Knowing the Townland is just the beginning...

Ready to bring your ancestors to life?

One of the most valuable sets of Irish genealogical information has just come online! The collection of Irish Valuation Office books has been digitized and made available on findmypast and the Irish National Archives.  This site serves to help make sense of them.

If you know your ancestor's name, the size of his holding, and the name of his townland, use the FIELD BOOK TRANSLATOR and HOUSE BOOK TRANSLATOR to unlock previously unattainable details about your ancestor's life on the farm.
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Access the Valuation Office Books:


Findmypast click HERE.
National Archive click HERE. 

Descriptions of the Office Books:
Irish Genealogy Toolkit.

Tenement Valuation ("Griffith's Valuation):
Click HERE.








No names...no problem

Despite the fact that most field books compiled prior to 1846 don't include our ancestor's names, there are a number of ways to deduce the rated value of the land they occupied.

For example, in the case of the townland Carrownphull in Co. Longford, although there are three plots indicated, the acreage of No. 1 and 2 covers 90% of the townland.  The value is rated between 12 and 14 shillings per acre.  A slight difference like this wouldn't indicate a dramatic difference in crop potential or easy of labor on the land. Plot No. 3 likely fell on the border of a neighboring townland.  

In light of this logic it stands to reason that if your ancestors lived in Carrownphull, they lived on land valued 12s. 6d.  to 14s. per statute acre.  

In this way we are able to discern the value of their land, despite the fact that their names aren't listed.  



WATCH the "No Names...no problem" video tutorial



DOWNLOAD the "No names...no problem" accompanying PDF